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Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation

Physical medicine and rehabilitation specialists, commonly referred to as physiatrists (pronounced fizz ee at' trist), diagnose, evaluate and manage children and adult patients with physical and/or cognitive impairment or disability. They have specialized training in non-surgical treatment of neurological and musculoskeletal conditions as well as impairments related to other organ systems (heart, lungs, etc.).

Physiatrists provide leadership to multidisciplinary teams focused on the restoration or development of physical, cognitive, social, recreational, occupational and vocational function in people whose abilities have been limited by pain, disease, trauma, or by congenital and developmental disorders. Depending on the nature of the impairment, the care they provide you may be short or long term.

The Loyola rehabilitation team includes highly trained rehabilitation specialists that include:

  • Certified hand therapists
  • Occupational therapists
  • Orthotists (work with splints, braces, etc.)
  • Physiatrists
  • Physical therapists
  • Prosthetists (work with artificial limbs)
  • Psychiatrists
  • Psychologists
  • Social workers
  • Speech pathologists
  • Recreational therapists
  • Rehabilitation nurse
  • Respiratory therapists
  • Vocational rehabilitation counselors
  • Work conditioning therapists
  • Work hardening therapists

Patients undergoing physical medical rehabilitation may be treated in a hospital, in a special rehabilitation unit, in their own home or on an outpatient basis.

You can watch a video to learn more about our Acute Inpatient Rehabilitation program.

Our physiatrists have expertise in the diagnosis and management of a multitude of disorders and conditions. They provide non-surgical care for the following types of conditions or injuries:

  • Amputations
  • Back or neck injuries
  • Brain injury
  • Carpal tunnel syndrome
  • Chronic back or neck pain
  • Chronic fatigue syndrome
  • Chronic pain disorders
  • Congenital disorders
  • Deconditioning related to severe illness or injury
  • Developmental disorders and delays
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Hand injuries
  • Major surgery rehabilitation
  • Major trauma or severe fractures
  • Orthopaedic conditions
  • Severe burn injuries
  • Spinal cord injury
  • Stroke rehabilitation

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