Liver Transplant

Our multidisciplinary transplantation teams provide patient-centered care and individualized treatment plans

In addition to your transplantation specialists who will care for you, many others will partner with you to provide supportive care that treats your whole person – body, mind and spirit. Your team will include: your liver physician, surgeon, transplant nurse coordinator, nurse practitioners, chaplains, physical therapists, dietitians, financial coordinators, clinical pharmacists, social workers, psychologists and transplant chaplains. If you would like to make an appointment or need assistance in finding the appropriate physician, please call us at 85-LiverDoc (855-483-7362).

10Transplant Center Liver SpecialistsClick Title to Open

Hepatologists 5

Jamie Berkes
Jamie Berkes
M.D.
Hepatology
Acute Liver Failure, Liver Transplantation, Advanced End Stage Liver Disease, Liver Cancer
Scott Cotler
Scott Cotler
M.D.
Hepatology
Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, Other causes of chronic liver disease, Cirrhosis, Liver Cancer
Eric Kallwitz
Eric Kallwitz
M.D.
Hepatology
Transplant Hepatology, General Hepatology, Fatty Liver disease, Endoscopy, Viral hepatitis
Steven Scaglione
Steven Scaglione
M.D.
Hepatology
NASH, Acute Liver Failure, Hepatitis C, Hepatocellular Carcinoma
Natasha Von Roenn
Natasha Von Roenn
M.D.
Hepatology
Hepatitis B & C, Liver Transplantation, Cirrhosis, Autoimmune Hepatitis

Liver surgeons 5

Massimo Asolati
Massimo Asolati
M.D.
Intra-Abdominal Transplantation
Liver Disorders, Liver Transplant, Kidney and Pancreas Transplant, Bile Duct Cancer
Diego Martin di Sabato
Diego Martin di Sabato
M.D.
Intra-Abdominal Transplantation
Liver Disorders, Liver Transplant, Bile Duct Cancer, Minimally Invasive Surgery, Kidney and...
Paul C. Kuo
Paul C. Kuo
M.D.,M.B.A., FACS
Surgical Oncology
Liver Transplant, Bile Duct Cancer, Hernia, Gallbladder Disorders, Minimally Invasive Surgery, Live...
Amy Lu
Amy Lu
M.D.,M.P.H.,M.B.A., FACS
Intra-Abdominal Transplantation
Liver Disorders, Liver Transplant, Bile Duct Cancer, Minimally Invasive Surgery, Kidney and...
Philip Wai
Philip Wai
M.D., FACS
Intra-Abdominal Transplantation
Kidney and Pancreas Transplant, Liver Cancer, Liver Transplant, Bile Duct Disorders

Liver Transplant Support StaffClick Title to Open

Patients who have been told they might need a transplant will first meet with a nurse coordinator. These staff members are all registered nurses who have an interest and extensive experience in the care of patients with chronic illnesses and transplants.


Your coordinator is responsible for arranging all the tests necessary to determine whether you would be a good candidate for a transplant. They will coordinate your care from your initial visit and for the follow-up appointments after your operation and recovery. Our coordinators are known for their responsiveness and will help you with any transplant-related issue for years to come.


You will meet with your multidisciplinary transplant team during the evaluation process. Your team will include: your transplant nephrologist, surgeon, nurse coordinator, nurse practitioners, procurement nurses, chaplains, physical therapists, dietitians, financial coordinators, clinical pharmacists, social workers, psychologists and transplant chaplains. Your coordinator will provide education that covers the process of transplantation, psychosocial and financial issues, the risks and benefits of transplantation and medication issues. The nurse coordinator will want to make sure you understand all of the material and will encourage you to ask questions so that you understand it.


When all the tests are completed, the team meets again to determine if transplantation is the best option for you. Medical, psychosocial and financial workups will be reviewed at that time. If the team approves eligibility, your name will be put on the waiting list.


After you have been listed, you will be asked to keep in contact with the transplant team and provide periodic updates on your health and insurance status. You will be sent education materials as well as a questionnaire that needs to be updated annually. While waiting for a transplant, you should carefully follow the health maintenance schedule designed specifically for you. If anything changes with your situation – health, insurance, residence, availability, phone numbers, vacations – you must notify your coordinator. The coordinator will maintain contact with you and your physicians during the waiting period so that your tests and records are current.


After a match has been found, your nurse coordinator will make arrangements for your admission and surgery.


After the operation, your coordinator will help you with discharge planning and provide extensive education on transplant medication, physical activity, diet restrictions and required follow-up care. Your coordinator also will schedule follow-up lab and doctors’ appointments and, if need be, help you submit disability papers. You will be followed quite closely during the first year after your transplant, which will include frequent lab and clinic visits. One thing that your coordinator will stress is the importance of taking all your anti-rejection medications every day, preferably at the same time each day.


Nurse practitioners will also be part of your care team. They work collaboratively with physicians and other members of your medical team to provide you with exceptional care, starting with your transplant evaluation and testing all the way through post-transplant management.


Nurse practitioners will also care for you while you are in the hospital or at a doctor’s visit. They prescribe medications, diagnose patients and work with physicians to develop treatment plans.  They are also experts in patient education before and after transplantation.  Nurse practitioners are adept at recognizing and understanding the signs of rejection and infection. They will instruct patients about the importance of timely medical treatment and the serious consequences if medical advice isn’t followed or symptoms are ignored. They also work closely with patients to manage any possible transplant-related complications.

Your clinical pharmacists will provide you with instruction on the medication that you will need to take after your transplant. They will also assist your physicians on their rounds when you are in the hospital after surgery. Your clinical pharmacists will evaluate the drugs you are prescribed and any side effects you may experience. They will also be on the watch for any possible negative drug interactions. As a key member of your medical team, they will monitor and adjust, if necessary, the anti-rejection medication that you will need to take. Your clinical pharmacists also will work closely with your nurse coordinator to ensure that you understand what medications you will be taking and what schedule you must follow.

Your transplant dietitian’s role is to ensure that you understand your individualized nutrition plan and are motivated about following it. At your initial visit, your dietitian will assess your gastrointestinal symptoms, consider possible vitamin and mineral deficiencies, conduct a nutrition/weight history and provide dietary education.  At the end of this visit, the dietitian will help you create nutritional goals and - if further education or intervention is required - provide you with additional direction.  Your transplant dietitian will meet with you during each of your hospital visits, adjusting your goals based on your progress and medical condition. With any additional nutrition concerns, you are strongly encouraged to call or to send an e-mail to your dietitian.  

At Loyola we know that the thought of a transplant can be overwhelming, not just emotionally but financially speaking as well. But our financial coordinators are well-versed in the language of insurance and will do the heavy lifting for you. They will answer any questions that you have about your insurance coverage and the bills that you receive. They will find out if your insurance covers procedures at Loyola and get an insurance case manager assigned to your case. Your financial coordinator also will determine if your insurance coverage includes work-up tests, the operation, post-op care and that you can meet the deductible and your out-of-pocket maximum. In addition, they will work with your nurses and insurance case manager to make sure that your insurance has officially approved you for a transplant and will pre-certify you for admissions to ensure that there are no penalty charges in your bills.

Transplant social workers are involved in all aspects of the transplant process. Social workers are skilled in psychosocial assessment and provide a range of services for patients and their families. These services include individual patient and family counseling, patient education and assistance with support groups and financial resources. Social workers see patients in the hospital, outpatient clinics and are available for phone consultation.

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