Nephrologist: Holly Mattix-Kramer, MD, MPH | Loyola Medicine

Holly Mattix-Kramer, MD, MPH

Holly Mattix-Kramer, MD, MPH

PARKS

Public Health Sciences
Medicine, Nephrology
Professor

Languages Spoken

English

Clinical Expertise

  • Glomerulonephritis
  • Hypertension
  • Kidney (Ureteric) Stone
  • Kidney Disorder
  • Nephrolithiasis
  • Renal Disease (Kidney Disease)

About Dr. Mattix-Kramer

Biography

Dr. Kramer received her M.D. from the Indiana University School of Medicine. After completing a nephrology fellowship at Harvard University Medical School in 2002, Dr. Kramer was jointly appointed to the Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, and Department of Preventative Medicine at the Loyola University Medical Center. She became co-director (Dr. Durazo) of the Clinical Research Methods and Epidemiology Program in 2005, developing several courses for the program, and later became the program director for the Program Director for the MPH Program in 2009. As an investigator, Dr. Kramer?s research focuses on obesity and kidney disease and genetic variants for kidney disease and she is a co-investigator for the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

Interests
Outdoor Activities

Medical Education

Medical School
Indiana University School of Medicine
Residency
Emory University School of Medicine - Internal Medicine: General
Fellowship
  • Harvard University Medical School Combined Nephrology Program - Internal Medicine: Nephrology

Board Certification

American Board of Internal Medicine
American Board of Internal Medicine Subspecialty Nephrology

Research

Research Interests: Obesity, kidney disease and genetic variants for kidney disease, intersection between kidney and cardiovascular disease.

1. Ricardo AC, Loop MS, Gonzalez F 2nd, et al: Incident Chronic Kidney Disease Risk among Hispanics/Latinos in the United States: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL). J Am Soc Nephrol. 2020 Jun;31(6):1315-1324.
2. Daugirdas SP, Markossian T, Mueller ER, et al: Urinary incontinence and chronic conditions in the US population age 50 years and older. Int Urogynecol J. 2020 May;31(5):1013-1020. doi: 10.1007/s00192-019-04137-y. Epub 2020 Jan 3. PubMed PMID: 31900549.
3. Tummalapalli SL, Vittinghoff E, Crews DC, et al. Chronic Kidney Disease Awareness and Longitudinal Health Outcomes: Results from the Reasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke Study. Am J Nephrol. 2020;51(6):463-472.
4. Drawz PE, Beddhu S, Kramer HJ, et al. Blood Pressure Measurement: A KDOQI Perspective. Am J Kidney Dis. 2020 Mar;75(3):426-434.
5. Kalantar-Zadeh K, Kramer HM, Fouque D. High-protein diet is bad for kidney health: unleashing the taboo. Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2020 Jan 1;35(1):1-4. doi: 10.1093/ndt/gfz216. PubMed PMID: 31697325.
6. Rathi N, Whelton PK, Chertow GM, et al: Influence of Prediabetes on the Effects of Intensive Systolic Blood Pressure Control on Kidney Events. Am J Hypertens. 2019 Nov 15;32(12):1170-1177.
7. Kramer H: Diet and Chronic Kidney Disease. Adv Nutr. 2019 Nov 1;10(Suppl_4):S367-S379.
8. Kramer H, Kalantar-Zadeh K: Obesity, preterm birth and kidney disease: a global epidemic. Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2019 Oct 1;34(10):1653-1656.
9. Teumer A, Li Y, Ghasemi S, Prins BP, et al: Genome-wide association meta-analyses and fine-mapping elucidate pathways influencing albuminuria. Nat Commun. 2019 Sep 11;10(1):4130.
10. Durazo-Arvizu RA, Pacheco-Dominguez RL, Sempos CT, et al: The Association between Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors and 25-Hydroxivitamin D and Related Analytes among Hispanic/Latino Adults: A Pilot Study. Nutrients. 2019 Aug 20;11(8).